Who Do You Look Up To?

It’s a couple weeks into the new year, and most people are contemplating the resolutions that they already have broken. Instead, I’m thinking about the people in life that I look up to.

The first person is my amazing fiance and best friend, David. He is wonderfully spontaneous and a little bit fly-by-the-seat-of-his-pants, which balances out my need to for advanced planning. He thinks nothing of getting home relatively early on a Monday night and deciding to go to a movie or randomly deciding to take a day off. And, it’s activities like these that remind me to enjoy the¬†spontaneity of life.

Second, my Mom. All my life she has encouraged me to do my best and really has been involved in everything I have done. There were times when I thought her involvement in PTA at school was crazy. Like the time my 7th grade math teacher called me by her name in class instead of my own. It turns out, that looking back, it was pretty cool to have had her around for all of my activities. She schlepped me (and my sister) all over Southern California when we were performing with our high school tall flag team, and to all of our many lessons (piano, math tutors, etc.) So, thank you, Mom, for everything you have done.

Who do you look up to and why? Share in the comments below.

Common Courtesy Still Is Part of Business

I was reminded twice today that business is more about common courtesy and building relationships than anything else.

First, I read a blog post titled “10 Things Your Grandmother Can Teach You About Social Media” on Social Media Today. It struck me that this post is not about the technicalities, such as which network to use or what information to post/share, of social media. It is about the common courtesy that people should extend to one another as human beings. It’s small but important things, including minding your manners, dressing appropriately, and doing what you say you’re going to do, when you say you’re going to do it, that make all the difference. Doing these small things will get you the job, story, etc. when all else fails.

Second, I had the privilege of hearing Tim Mead, vice president of communications for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim speak to a small group (no more than 12) of IABC students at Cal State Fullerton this evening. He has been working for the Angels organization for 32 years in some capacity, including intern, secretary, assistant, director of public relations and more. His greatest takeaways from his years of experience working for several club owners and managers are this:

  1. Be polite and courteous to everyone, no matter who they are – media, players, fans, agents, children, etc.
  2. Always reply to every phone message, fax, email, Tweet etc. You never know where it will lead you.
  3. Listen. Often times his job is about fixing problems, and the only way to do that is to have all the information. Become the confidant and you’ll always have what you need.
  4. Nothing can replace please, thank you, yes please, no thank you, I don’t know and I’ll find out. These phrases can help get you out of almost every jam you can think of.

So few people take the time to say please and thank you these days, that when you hear it, you’re almost surprised. And it shouldn’t be that way. When was the last time you held the door open for someone and they just walked through without saying a word? How did that make you feel?

Lifes Moments Captured

I paused for a moment on the fourth floor of the parking structure at Cal state Fullerton. The colors really made me take a moment and marvel at the world.